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ENDANGERED PLACES

Program

The Endangered Places Advocacy component is vital to the success of the Fund. It supports staff to seek out partnerships with community development organizations/ other preservation groups/ individuals, to communicate the economic advantages of preservation, to encourage preservation and adaptive reuse vs. destruction, to provide technical support to community leaders seeking to save a particular building, and to locate vulnerable properties for investment that have failed in the marketplace.

The Endangered Places Revolving Fund is the essential tool designed to intervene in threatened properties through purchase, lease, financing or stabilization of properties.

 

The goal is to aid responsible owners or put property in the hands of preservation-minded owners who will be responsible for the rehabilitation. 

Preservation SC's Endangered Places Program was created in 1996 as a part of the organization's initiative to support historic preservation in communities across South Carolina. The program is made up of two components: the Endangered Places Revolving Fund, and Endangered Places Advocacy.

PAST REVOLVING FUND PROPERTIES

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Good Hope Baptist Church

Eastover, Richland County

Listed in the National Register 1986. 

The church, which had been dormant for years, was donated to Preservation South Carolina with the stipulation that the structure must always remain intact. In less than a month, a buyer was found, a large nearby Black community eager to find a permanent place of worship for their congregants.       

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Mt. Olivet Church

Newberry County

Listed in the National Register 1982. 

This church was donated to Preservation SC in 2022 due to a dwindled congregation. It was sold the same year to a local congregation in need of a worship space.

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Ruff Cobb House

Newberry County

Listed in the National Register 1980. 

This ca. 1850 home was donated to Preservation SC in July 2020. It was sold to a preservation-minded owner in 2021, who has since restored the property.

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